Prince Rupert Community League, Edmonton AB

Addressing the needs of the Prince Rupert Community
in the heart of Edmonton, AB

What's New in Prince Rupert?

Cold Weather Safety

A message from Alberta Health Services and Emergency Medical Services

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) paramedics respond to a number of cold weather related emergencies every winter. However, by taking appropriate measures to dress properly, anticipate sudden weather changes and preparing to be out in the cold, may reduce your risk of sustaining a cold weather illness/injury. It’s also advised you store an emergency kit in your vehicle at all times containing extra clothing, blankets and other road-side supplies.

Frostnip

  • Frost-nipped skin is extremely cold, but not yet frozen skin;
  • It commonly affects the ears, nose, cheeks, fingers and toes; 
  • The skin may look red and possibly feel numb to the touch;
  • When treated promptly, frostnip usually heals without complication;
  • Move to a warm environment and immediately, but gently, re-warm the affected area through skin to skin contact (i.e. hand covering tips of ears).

Frostbite

  • Frostbite occurs when skin becomes so cold, the skin and underlying tissues freeze;
  • Affected skin may look white & waxy and will feel hard to the touch;
  • Move to a warm environment immediately and place the affected area in warm, not hot, water, until fully re-warmed;
  • Call 9-1-1, or seek further medical attention as required.

Hypothermia

  • Hypothermia is abnormally low body temperature, less than 34°C (as compared to normal body temperature of about 37°C);
  • Early hypothermia may manifest as profound shivering; moderate hypothermic patients may act inappropriately: stumbling, mumbling, and fumbling, as their body temperature continues to drop resulting in severe hypothermia (<30°C);
  • Left untreated, severe hypothermia may progress to unconsciousness or death;
  • Early recognition and prompt medical attention is key. Call 9-1-1. Don’t forget to protect yourself from the factors that originally lead to the patient’s situation;
  • Initiate gentle re-warming as quickly as possible. Remove any wet or constrictive clothing; cover with blankets, or sleeping bags. Protect from further heat loss: eliminate contact with cold surfaces, and shield from wind and moisture.

Click to view the poster.

Yielding to Emergency Vehicles

A message from Alberta Health Services and Emergency Medical Services

Time is the enemy in an emergency. For everyone’s safety, it is important for motorists to understand how to correctly yield right of way to emergency vehicles with lights and siren activated. You can help EMS, police, and fire get to the scene quickly and safely by following these rules of the road:

When an emergency vehicle approaches with lights and siren activated:

  • If you’re in the middle of an intersection when an emergency vehicle approaches with lights and siren activated, safely clear the intersection;
  • On a one or two lane road, motorists should move to the right side of the road, slow down, and then stop. Remember to signal;
  • On a road with three or more lanes, motorists should move to the nearest side of the road and stop. If driving in the centre lane, move to the right side of the road and stop. Remember to signal;
  • Come to a complete stop and wait for the emergency vehicle to pass. Shoulder check for more emergency vehicles (there is often more than one) before re-entering traffic flow. Remember to signal;
  • Emergency vehicles might use any available road space to maneuver. This could include the shoulders, turning lanes, in order to pass other traffic.

When operating a vehicle:

  • Drive attentively and defensively at all times. Be cognizant to sirens and be prepared to yield the right of way;
  • It is Alberta law for motorists to slow down to at least 60 km/hour (unless a lower speed is posted) when driving past a stopped emergency vehicle. This includes EMS, police, fire, and tow trucks with their lights activated;
  • Do not break the rules of the road in order to give right of way to an emergency vehicle. This could include proceeding through a red light, or making an illegal turn. Actions such as these jeopardize all motorists in the area;
  • Drivers must place their full attention on the roadway and toward the safe operation of their vehicle at all times. The fine for distracted driving in Alberta is $287.00;
  • Always leave plenty of space between your vehicle and an emergency vehicle, should it be required to stop suddenly.

Click to view the poster.

Recent News

  • Yielding to Emergency Vehicles: A message from Alberta Health Services and Emergency Medical Services Time is the... more »

  • Cold Weather Safety: A message from Alberta Health Services and Emergency Medical Services Emergency... more »

  • Blatchford Community: Interested in information about our neighbouring community, Blatchford? Visit the... more »

Upcoming Events